Basic Types of Siding

Many Different Types of Siding

vinyl siding

Vinyl siding is a common option for many homes. It’s famously known as never needing to be painted, because the color is baked into the panel and runs all the way through to the other side. It’s possible to paint vinyl, due to today’s advancements in paint quality, but it’s not necessary. In addition, vinyl siding is by far the most inexpensive siding option for your home. While this is an attractive quality, it’s low-cost comes with a price. Depending on the environment of where you live, vinyl siding can sometimes split or break from temperature changes. It may also become susceptible to water leakage due to the installation process. Moisture that enters the home can contribute to mold and affect your home's structural integrity, much like with a roof.

Insulated vinyl siding acts similarly to standard vinyl siding. While regular vinyl can imitate any imperfections in the wall being sided, insulated vinyl siding will refrain from warping and appear more stable and smoother. This is because a layer of insulation is installed beneath the siding panels. Besides the general disadvantages of vinyl siding, one true drawback of insulated vinyl siding is the cost, which may be anywhere between 20-50% higher than standard vinyl siding. The reasoning for this being the skill needed for the insulation installation.

insulated-siding
metal siding

Metal siding is gaining popularity for a variety of reasons. Not only does it make for a more modern look, but depending on the environment, it could raise the curb appeal of your home as well. While traditional siding could often mean eventual insect infestations and mold growth, metal siding has none of these issues. It does not retain moisture needed for mold to grow and thrive, and it leaves no room for pests to make a home underneath it. Although metal siding will pay off in the long run, it comes with a higher up-front cost compared to other standard siding options. Depending on how it is installed, metal siding could be tricky to replace if it becomes dented or imperfections, as the whole metal sheet will probably need to be replaced.

Natural wood siding has long been used and is recently becoming more popular for it being ecofriendly. Arguably the best part of natural wood siding is its sustainability factor. Wood is natural and organic, making it easier to produce into siding than vinyl or metal materials. Because natural wood siding doesn’t need to be ordered from a factory, this makes it widely available to anyone looking to do a quicker installation job. Because it can easily be painted or stained, natural wood siding is more customizable to fit your home aesthetic or environment. Although natural wood makes for a beautiful siding option, there are costly downsides that need to be considered. This includes the fact that pest infestations are a very possible problem. Also, paying more for heating or cooling, depending on your environment, because of the lack of insulation that would normally come with factory-made siding options. These are a few aspects of natural wood siding that take commitment to upkeep to ensure your home stays safe.

natural wood siding
everlast siding

Everlast siding is becoming increasingly popular for homes, and with good reason. It is extremely durable when facing high winds, rain, or debris. More than likely, you won’t ever need to replace Everlast siding due to dents, cracks, or water moisture, as it is impermeable to water. In addition to this, it’s also impenetrable to wood-eating insects that could otherwise threaten a home's structural integrity. This is because Everlast is entirely man-made, using petroleum-based products, which is not eco-friendly or sustainable. This may be a problem for some homeowners, but a benefit is that Everlast may last as long as your home does, making it less wasteful in terms of replacement and maintenance.

Depending on the environment of where you live, vinyl siding can sometimes split or break from temperature changes. It may also become susceptible to water leakage due to the installation process. Moisture that enters the home can contribute to mold and affect your home's structural integrity, much like with a roof.
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